Shoujo Shuumatsu Ryokou – Box 1


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Kept you waiting, huh?

Welcome back to 2017! It’s been a long time coming, but I swear Boxes 2 and 3 won’t take another year to come out.

I suppose I don’t really have a lot to say. This was really always going to be a bonus project (if you’ll recall, our actual Fall 2017 pickup was Kujisuna), but I think the time it ended up taking caught everybody by surprise. On the bright side, if you watched this back when it was airing, great time for a rewatch. If you didn’t, thanks for your patience.

SSR is a truly wonderful show, and we did our best to do our best with it. That said, even after a year in production, there might still be errors, and do let us know if you find any of those. There might be a patch or batch coming along at the end.

With that said, please enjoy!

Torrent | Magnet

Notes:

SSR is a show that’s a bit lighter on the notes, relatively, since a lot of the notes I produce are less about translation and more about culture (or whatever I happened to find interesting during my research). That said, I do of course have stuff to talk about. It is a little bit spoilery, so avoid these if you haven’t watched the whole show yet.

First, in broad strokes, there’s some terminology that I tried to keep consistent across all the episodes (having access to all of them at once, instead of going week by week, makes this a lot easier). The major ones are ‘stratum’ and ‘ancients’.

The decision to use ‘stratum’ over ‘level’ or something like that is mostly because it’s a bit more evocative. It also has a very useful adjectival form (‘stratified’; cf. ‘levelled’ which means something else), but moreover it’s clear that there are big divisions (strata) and small divisions (floors, levels?).

昔の人 is a phrase that shows up a lot verbatim, but it coexists with a different phrase, 古代人. As a result these need to be translated differently. The show suggests that 昔の人 refers to a generation much less removed from Chito and Yuuri’s than 古代人, and usually it’s translated as ‘people of the past’. Sometimes it’s just ‘people’ (as in, ‘people used to do this’) because it gets tiring to read the whole thing over and over (Japanese appears to care less about this than English does). 古代人, then, gets translated as ‘the ancients’ (a term already in use in English) and 古代 as ‘ancient’.

Less importantly, we have their vehicle thing. It’s a Kettenkrad (SdKfz 2), and I don’t know what that is. Is it a motorcycle (‘Kettenkrad’ is short for something like ‘tracked motorcycle’)? Is it a car? Is it a tank? A gun tractor? Ultimately it differs based on context. Sometimes it’s referred to as 車, in which case the natural choice is to follow that and call it a ‘car’ (you could, under some definitions, maybe call it an armoured car, or you could think of a car as being a very general term for a vehicle). Sometimes it’s called a 車両, where it might be ‘vehicle’ in broad terms. It isn’t ever called a 戦車, so it’s never called a ‘tank’. It’s also never called a ‘motorcycle’, because Kanazawa had one of those, and he called it a バイク, as expected. Anyway, if any of you military guys want to tell me what to do here, I’m all ears.

That wraps up broad terminology, but there are a couple specific cases in this box.

In Episode 4, there’s talk of the Western Paradise. The original Japanese is 極楽浄土, which literally translates to ‘Pure Land of Ultimate Bliss’ or something like that, which is a specific location in Buddhism. The Sanskrit name is Sukhavati (lit: ‘bliss’ or something like that, no Pure Land business), and there are a few English renderings, including ‘the Western Paradise’, ‘the Western Pure Land’, and just ‘the Pure Land’, corresponding to any number of its names in any number of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tibetan, and Vietnamese (it’s Amida’s paradise, and it lies to the West). The major factor here is that it runs into a thing from Episode 2 where Chi and Yuuri are in the bath talking about ‘Paradise’, which the Japanese just say upon entering baths (as Anglos might call something ‘heaven’ (though typically without the caps, which I put in for precisely this parallel)). Obviously nobody would say ‘Pure Land!’ upon entering a bath, so ‘Paradise’ ends up as the best option, though even that’s stretching it a little. ‘Sukhavati’ itself obviously can’t be comprehensibly decomposed in English, so that was out entirely. If Amida had been mentioned, I might have made it ‘Amida’s Paradise’ or something, but he wasn’t, so we’re good.

Also, in Short 2, there’s talk about biological classes. Pisces isn’t a real class anymore, since it’s been found to be paraphyletic, but, well, what else are you going to call the fish?

Finally, I spent a really long time translating the entirety of all three songs in this show (I recommend getting the CD and listening to them all!). I’m sure nobody asked for this, but I’m not letting it go to waste, so for now, take Ugoku, Ugoku.

Let’s head back, we got far enough today
Next time let’s go even farther out that way
Creaking on

Faint wonders we gaze upon
Many joys we stumble on
Our hopes that, gleaming, shine along
Moving on, moving on

Idle chitter-chatter all day long
Whether rain or shine, keeping on
Now, O loneliness, get thee gone
Moving on, moving on

Just like the weight solving a puzzle puts on your mind
It won’t be long that we’ll wait before we feel that feeling again

So now on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our shoes
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, the same way I bet
Now then, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our shoes
And go against the way our spinning planet moves
That’s right, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our groove
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, I want to forget
Now then, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
I know that that’s for sure our a-a-a-answer-swer

This old wall, huge and grey and in our way
Still not sure exactly how we’ll get on through

Striding on

Though the road from here stretches on
We’ll get through this marathon
Since the goal is still over yon
Moving on, moving on

And I know the joke you’re sitting on
Is a truly awful one
Just a little bit further on
Moving on, moving on

Patience that’s born from wanting coffee, warming and sweet
Now that its fruit has been borne, it’s time to pick it and take a bite

So now on ONE TWO THREE let’s laugh ’til we turn blue
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, I want to forget
But still on ONE TWO THREE let’s laugh ’til we turn blue
Just like the way the colours all around us change
That’s right, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our groove
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, I want to forget
Now then, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
I know that that’s for sure our a-a-a-answer-swer

Our wonder world

Today again like the weight solving a puzzle puts on your mind
It won’t be long that we’ll wait before we feel this feeling again

So now on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our shoes
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, I want to forget
Now then, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our shoes
And go against the way our spinning planet moves
That’s right, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get into our groove
Whether today, tomorrow, or yesterday, I want to forget
Now then, on ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
I know that that’s for sure, deep in my core,
Our looked-for a-a-a-answer-swer

ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move
ONE TWO THREE let’s get ready to move


12 thoughts on “Shoujo Shuumatsu Ryokou – Box 1

  1. Anon321

    Their vehicle falls under the category of a tank or light tractor and has been described as an armored motorcycle tank, tracked motorcycle, motorcycle tank, and light tractor. For all of the different descriptions, I think the name that fits best is KettenKrad. All of the listings and descriptions I have seen have one thing in common. They refer to the vehicle as a Kettenkrad. I think it is obvious what the vehicle is and does just by watching it in action, so a descriptive name isn’t necessary. Much as a Harley is a Herley, or a Ferrari is a Ferrari. They instantly evoke a certain type of vehicle. Even though most people have never heard of Kettenkrad, the association is quickly made.

    Reply
  2. Fireboltfury

    Wikipedia classifies the kettenkrad as a “light half-track gun tractor”, and if you wanted to actually translate kettenkrad its basically chain/track-motorcycle

    Reply
  3. marmar

    oh sweet i get to watch this show a third time!! looking forward to it, your fansubs are always top notch

    Reply
  4. Nuco

    Thank you, great job fansubbing this anime gem. 2 comments from me:
    1. In episode 1, at 20:41 – is the the comma missing in Yuuri’s line: “Ow ow, ow!”?
    2. In episode 3, at 6:30 – I strongly opt for using term “vehicle” in this scene. Kanazawa clearly doesn’t know what Kettenkrad is, so it’s safe to assume that he’s using term “kuruma” as a very general term for a vehicle.

    Reply
    1. tsuru Post author

      As always, thank you to everyone for commenting, and especially to those of you who had input. I’ll only reply to the one comment for efficiency. First, since it’s quick, the comma’s not missing. The Japanese is close to いたた、いた, and there isn’t really a pause between the ‘first’ and ‘second’ itae, so it doesn’t really need a comma in the English. ‘Ow ow’ is meant to just read quickly, and I think ‘owow’ is kind of stupid.

      About the Kettenkrad, which I should’ve known people would care about. Always the military stuff that people care about (no Amidists in the house?). I’m certainly hesitant to really translate ‘Kettenkrad’ totally; the only circumstance where I would would likely be if it were explicitly ‘tracked motorcycle’ or something in Japanese (Japanese Wikipedia calls it a 半装軌車 (‘half-tracked vehicle’); that kind of terminology never appears in the show). Leaving it as ‘Kettenkrad’ is an attractive option when it actually is referred to as such (i.e. as ケッテンクラート), as it will be in Episode 6 (on both counts), but inadmissible otherwise. For what it’s worth, by far the most common reference to it is via stuff like こいつ or あいつ, which, you know, will be translated as they will.

      In any case, at other times, like here in Episode 3, basically I just read what the Japanese says. In this scenario (6:30), it was 車, so I took the obvious route and went with ‘car’. Yes, 車 can mean ‘vehicle’ (or just ‘wheels’ in general; maybe I should’ve gone with ‘spinning chrome rims’), but ‘car’ can also mean vehicle, among other things. Of course, that sort of general interpretation isn’t the first thing English speakers think of (what they think of is a consumer automobile), but the immediate association in Japanese is also to, you know, the Toyota-type deal. That’s not to say that ‘vehicle’ isn’t a good option (it is), but to defend usage of ‘car’ as one also. I would also probably personally refer to the Kettenkrad as a car the first time I saw it.

      Further, we have 車両 used in this episode as well (8:33), which I read as significantly more generic ‘vehicle’ than 車. I could, of course, have just used ‘vehicle’ for both terms, but when it’s possible to preserve a distinction I generally err on the conservative side of doing so. This isn’t a particularly strong argument, but the way Chito phrases her question here (かなざわの車両は?; translated as ‘Don’t you have a vehicle, Kanazawa?’ but easily something as strong as ‘Where’s your vehicle?’) also suggests that she expects him to have one of some kind. In particular, we might be justified in assuming (given the difference in word choice) that Chito’s well aware that people have bikes (she isn’t surprised when he mentions his) and phrases her question in general terms to reflect that. Ultimately it boils down to semantics again: he uses 車 and she uses 車両; he’s not familiar with the Kettenkrad (though I’d hazard that he’s familiar with armoured cars and the like, and almost certainly tanks), but she’s familiar with bikes. Then it seems reasonable to extract a difference between these terms, where 車両 is meant to read as more generic than 車, being used by a more knowledgeable person to ask about a less well-defined object. ‘Vehicle’ and ‘car’, respectively, then serve our purposes best.

      That’s a lot of text and sketchy logic for something that boils down to ‘車 means car’ (and a lot of it’s ex post facto rationalization), but there you go.

      Reply
      1. Mxxs

        OK, just promise to leave it as Kettenkrad when it is actually referred to as such…, please. The rest of the rationale seems good, I agree… Also, I would personally recommend watching the specials in order after having finished the whole show, but that’s just me.

        Reply

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